The Revolution of Sabine by Beth Ain Levine
Candlewick, 2008, 224 pages
YA Historical Fiction

In Beth Ain Levine’s The Revolution of Sabine, Sabine’s revolution is not the only revolution going on. Sabine is experiencing the American Revolution but through a lens which is atypical for American readers. Sabine is a young French girl, struggling with the idea of traditional womanhood in Eighteenth Century France. Her coming of age becomes more difficult as, not only her headstrong attitudeDSC_0027 leads her to want something other than what her parents want, but the presence of Benjamin Franklin in France and his grand ideas. It doesn’t hurt that her governess’s son, Michel, has been hanging around more often and has plans to run off to the New World to help the colonies fight their English parent.  When Michel offers Sabine the opportunity to come with him, she’s torn. Does she leave her controlling parents or let the boy who’s grown on her more than she expected go?

Characterizations of the inhabitants of Levine’s story are rather flat. While the motivations of some of them are very clear (such as Sabine’s mother), their actions and descriptions cause a caricature effect, pushing their personalities to the extreme and making them somewhat unbelievable. Unexpectedly, one of the most reasonable characters seemed to be Benjamin Franklin, who makes brief cameos in the novel but does not get directly involved in the action of the events. Sabine herself is predictable as the but-I-don’t-want-to-get-married-mother teenage daughter typical of similar stories. Some of the characters mirror, in a superficial way, characters of a Jane Austen novel. Sabine’s friends provide the gossip-y ladies who care only for marriage; her potential suitor the
antagonistic and rude upper-class would-rather-get-the-plague-than-marry guy; the we-grew-up-together-but-we-aren’t-actually-related love interest; the actually-pretty-cool dad — you get the picture. All of this might be fine except these characters are recurring in historical writing and feel unoriginal.

Although Levine’s main character is sixteen or seventeen, the book feels more appropriate for readers ages nine to twelve. The content may be a little political for readers of that age, but the writing style fits right in with other books readers of those ages might be reading. The themes of the book are similarly very clear, leaving little room for debate. This may make the book a good candidate for younger students doing book reports or analyses, but for the casual reader, makes the experience somewhat uncomfortable. If Sabine had a theme song, it would probably be “Free Bird.” We get it.

The ending of The Revolution of Sabine isn’t totally predictable if a little anti-climactic. It’s a strange mixture of realistic and unrealistic that left me feeling somewhat unsatisfied. It tied up the book as a whole with a shrug for me. This book had been sitting on my TBR list for several years and, ultimately, I didn’t feel like it was worth the anticipation and guilt I felt whenever I saw it sitting at the top of my Goodread’s list. This might be a great selection if you teach middle school English or are a middle school student. Beyond that, there are better options out there.

❤❤ out of ❤❤❤❤❤